News and Resources

Kiio and Quartz Health Solutions’ Low Back Pain Study Demonstrates the Success of Digital Therapeutic in Lowering Costs and Improving Outcomes


Program Dramatically Cut Medical Spending; Reduced Utilization of ED, Urgent Care, Aggressive Treatment and Diagnostics; and Decreased Fills for Opioid Prescriptions

 

Madison, Wis. (September 10, 2018) – Today, Kiio and Quartz Health Solutions unveiled the results of a one-year study to evaluate the impact of Kiio’s digital program on the challenges presented by low back pain. Low back pain affects one in three American adults every year and costs the U.S. over $100 billion annually. The study demonstrates success improving the lives of patients living with chronic pain while reducing medical spend and the danger of opioids. Quartz offered Kiio to plan members with a history of low back pain. Read about the significant improvements experienced by Kiio participants.

Kiio to present at Pittsburgh Business Group on Health Sept. 6


Low back pain is the number one cause of opioid prescriptions and a leading driver of employment costs.

This is especially relevant given the increasing threat opioids have had on our communities in recent years.

Kiio CEO Dave Grandin and VP Product Strategy Lydia Zeller will present Kiio’s digital solution for back pain Sept. 6th at Pittsburgh Business Group on Health’s 2018 Symposium, Accelerate the New Era of Healthcare.

Dave and Lydia will share details on how Kiio is delivering a 24/7, consumer-centric solution proven to improve health and empower individuals, while reducing use of opioids and aggressive medical treatments. The presentation will include Kiio’s clinical and financial outcomes.

To register for the event, to be held at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center, click here.

Digital Solutions for Healthcare’s Major Cost Drivers to be Presented July 31


Kiio, Livongo, Mercer and Blue Cross Blue Shield Massachusetts speak candidly about how digital therapeutics are positively impacting health while averting lost productivity, disability, unnecessary medical costs and even opioid addiction

Boston, Mass (July 24, 2018) – Chronic conditions such as low back pain and diabetes are major drivers of medical and employment costs for employers and health plans. Kiio CEO David Grandin will be presenting at the Annual National Employee Health & Well Being Summit on how digital therapeutics are helping to treat these prevalent and costly medical concerns. For example, Kiio for Low Back Pain is shown to reduce pain, the reliance on opioids, and overall medical spending. Click here to read more about this upcoming panel and the latest news on digital therapies.

Breaking Health Podcast Features Dave Grandin, Kiio President and CEO as Digital Health Innovator


Dave Grandin, President and CEO of Kiio, is featured in Breaking Health’s podcast to discusses the company’s work helping payers and employers better manage individuals with low back pain.  He discusses Kiio’s unique focus on optimizing care pathways around low back pain and the science behind better engaging people to partner in improving their own health.

“Our goal is to engage people in care that is individualized, personal, convenient, and effective… while also scalable and high-value for the payer and employer.”

– Dave Grandin, CEO, Kiio

 

To listen to the full episode click here.

How This Startup Is Helping Improve Physical Therapy Outcomes


Often times when patients are
going through physical therapy,
they are simply given pieces of paper with a list of activities to do at home. Fortunately, Madison, Wisconsin-based Kiio has improved this process by developing a technology platform that changes the way care is provided to patients. Kiio says that it empowers healthcare payers and providers to improve outcomes, reduce costs and increase revenue.

To read the entire article, click here.

Fitchburg startup Kiio to help ease back pain for those insured through WEA Trust


Fitchburg startup Kiio is getting a double boost from WEA Trust, the not-for-profit Madison company that
provides health insurance plans for public employers throughout Wisconsin.

Kiio is getting a $1 million investment from WEA Trust as well as a three-year contract to provide services designed to help people with lower back pain.

Click here to read the entire story.

Kiio CEO Makes List of Madison’s Top Healthcare Innovators


For his work in creating an innovative platform that is reducing costs and improving outcomes in the healthcare industry, Kiio CEO Dave Grandin was named to the 2017 M List by Madison Magazine.

The award is a who’s who of organizations and individuals who are having an impact on the local culture and economy. The M List is focusing on healthcare innovation in its fifth year.

Grandin is one of 30 who was selected for helping to inspire individuals to do important work and improve the community. Kiio announced recently a strategic partnership with WEA Trust to provide its members evidence-based care and coaching to reduce low back pain and improve quality of life.

“I’m honored to be recognized in this year’s Madison Magazine M List,” Grandin said. “Making an impact not only in the community but in the healthcare industry is something we strive for daily.”

The award winners will be recognized at an event later this fall.

Kiio and WEA Trust Form Strategic Partnership


 

Further validating that healthcare payers are actively investing in solutions to improve value through enhanced member engagement, Kiio Inc. announced today it has received a $1 million investment from WEA Trust, a not-for-profit insurance company that provides group health insurance and administrative services to public employers throughout Wisconsin.

“We’re excited about Kiio because their individualized care solution transforms the way members interact with healthcare,” WEA Trust President and CEO Mike Quist said. “It’s our vision at WEA Trust to ensure our members receive effective, affordable, convenient and high-quality care.”

The Kiio Platform, which launched in January, optimizes outcomes and the patient experience by delivering individualized information and care tailored to a patient’s specific situation. Kiio’s Low Back Pain program employs an automated multi-level screening and triage process to provide the patient with evidence-based care and coaching to reduce pain and improve quality of life.

“We are very excited to have WEA Trust as both a customer and an innovative partner,” Kiio President and CEO Dave Grandin said. “Their investment reinforces an alignment of interests where technology conveniently enables improved outcomes for patients at lower costs for both the patient and insurer.”

The capital will be used to further advance commercialization efforts of Kiio’s Low Back Pain Program. Kiio has stated plans to seek venture capital investment in 2018 for further development and commercialization of its health engagement platform.

Wisconsin State Journal: Kiio’s injury-screening technology will get a military workout


By: Judy Newman

When a person enlists in the U.S. military, in addition to going through a standard physical exam, there may also be tests someday for physical strength and range of motion — if a joint project involving the Department of Defense and a Fitchburg startup proves successful.

Kiio, a company whose technology helps screen people for muscle-related injuries and monitors the progress of their treatment, has enrolled the first participants in a study to see how likely an enlistee is to suffer chronic tendinopathy and to track how well treatment is working.

The $1.3 million, three-year grant will study 318 participants in a test that will be conducted at UW-Madison and analyzed by the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine.

It is one of two significant developments for Kiio this summer that could open a lot of doors for the young company.

Tendinopathy refers to tendon damage, often caused by overuse.

“When we think about military injuries, we think of injuries having to do with guns and bombs,” said Dave Grandin, Kiio CEO. But, he said, studies have shown non-combat musculoskeletal injuries are the leading cause of limited-duty days and disability in the U.S. military.

If enlistees are checked for the strength and range of motion of various tendons from the start, Grandin said, it would create a baseline to help “predict the onset of an injury but also help to rehabilitate someone when they do have an injury.”

Kiio’s wireless sensor measures strength and endurance of muscles, and the company’s software shows the results on an electronic tablet.

The testing process, developed in collaboration with the UW-La Crosse, will look at people who are physically fit and between the ages of 18 and 42 who are not necessarily enlistees but might have the physical qualifications, Grandin said. Nearly 30 percent of the participants will have tendinopathy; the others will not.

“Chronic tendinopathy is one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases,” said Dr. John Wilson, who is directing the study at the UW-Madison. “There is currently no efficient, standardized, objective method to quantify tendon performance, and this is a significant limitation in our ability to assess treatment efficacy.”

The University of Miami team will develop a normal database and create an algorithm that will be used to track treatment and to prevent injuries.

Grandin said Kiio will receive about $700,000 of the federal grant while the rest will go to UW-Madison and University of Miami.

He said if the study shows the effectiveness of Kiio’s technology, it could be a tool not only for the military but for all types of sports.

Meanwhile, Kiio also has received a $1 million investment from a company whose name is not yet being disclosed.

Grandin said the investment will be used to work toward commercializing a new program for the company aimed at helping people with lower-back pain, a problem that affects up to one-fourth of U.S. adults each year, according to the National Institutes of Health.

“The cost associated with this problem … is massive,” Grandin said.

He said Kiio’s technology can screen a patient to determine the type of back pain and guide the person through the appropriate exercises that don’t require special equipment. A pilot program is underway on that, Grandin said.

“It prevents people from using services they don’t need to use, like opioids, steroids or spine surgery,” he said.

Kiio, founded in 2011, has raised more than $5 million so far and has 16 employees.

Kiio, DoD to Collaborate on Musculoskeletal Disease Treatment Project


Today Kiio Inc. announced the enrollment of the first human subjects in the company’s $1.3 million multi-year, multi-institutional Department of Defense project to develop and validate a novel protocol to assist treatment and risk assessment for chronic tendinopathy.

“Our goal is to provide a fast, cost-effective, portable protocol to inform treatment, determination of work-readiness, and prediction of injury for Servicemembers as well as the general population,” Kiio CEO David Grandin said.“We are honored to be working with a stellar team of collaborators, and look forward to making a substantive contribution to an issue that places a tremendous burden on our military in terms of cost, productivity, and quality of life.”

The technology combines Kiio’s clinically validated force sensor (Kiio Sensor®) with a software application which automatically guides administration of the protocol and calculates and compiles complex muscle performance metrics.

The protocol, developed in collaboration with Dr. Patrick Grabowski, MPT, PhD (University of Wisconsin – La Crosse), will be tested with 318 participants in a trial overseen by the University of Wisconsin – Madison under the direction of Dr. John Wilson, MD, MS.

“Chronic tendinopathy is one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases,” Wilson said. “There is currently no efficient, standardized, objective method to quantify tendon performance, and this is a significant limitation in our ability to assess treatment efficacy.”

Data analysis and modeling will be performed at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine by a team led by Dr. Kathryn Roach, PT, PhD.

“The Kiio technology is able to quickly capture a tremendous amount of highly-accurate data,” Roach said. “We will be analyzing this data to establish a normative database and generate a decision -making algorithm that can be utilized not only in treatment, but also in risk assessment and injury prevention.”

About the Award
This work is supported by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, through the DoD Joint Program Committee 8/Clinical and RehabilitativeMedicine Research Program Neuromusculoskeletal Injuries Research Award under Award No. W81XWH-16-1-0789. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the Department of Defense.